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Thread: A Gallery of Oriole Images - Hagerman NWR May 14

  1. #1

    Default A Gallery of Oriole Images - Hagerman NWR May 14

    On my last visit to Hagerman NWR, May 14, I experienced something of a mini-fallout of migrants and local birds in a single willow tree. Actually it's a small cluster of two or three bushy willows about halfway down the short drive to the photo blind. I hardly ever see anything very interesting in this tree so it was a surprise to find it just hopping with birds: Dozens of Yellow Warblers and two kinds of orioles and a short stop over by a single Bobolink represented the migrants. Several Scissortails and Eastern Kingbirds shared the upper bare snags peacefully but chased off any small flycatcher that tried to join them. Local breeders Dickcissels and Red-winged Blackbirds sang and displayed from lower branches, while Eastern Bluebirds tried to find a place on their normally private willow branches. I had brief glimpses of a Common Yellowthroat and another warbler that might have been a Mourning Warbler. All in all about twenty species at that one tree including close flyby swallows. The Yellow Warblers and orioles were interesting in that they used the willow as home base but would repeatedly foray out over the goose field that the tree bordered and drop from sight into the vetch cover crop then return to the tree after a while. Whether they were eating insect or plant food I am not sure but one of the images shows what appears to be a flower bud or seed (more correctly a legume I think) in the beak of an oriole. Not the typical feeding behavior you think of for warblers or orioles.


    A first spring male Orchard Oriole in the vetch:
    ORCHARD ORIOLE 3 by k.nanney, on Flickr

    Two views of an adult male Orchard Oriole in the willow:
    ORCHARD ORIOLE 4 by k.nanney, on Flickr

    ORCHARD ORIOLE 5 by k.nanney, on Flickr

    A female Orchard Oriole:
    ORCHARD ORIOLE 6 by k.nanney, on Flickr

    A very cooperative male Baltimore Oriole gave me dozens of images in different poses. A sample of three:
    BALTIMORE ORIOLE 1 by k.nanney, on Flickr

    BALTIMORE ORIOLE 2 by k.nanney, on Flickr

    BALTIMORE ORIOLE 3 by k.nanney, on Flickr

    I haven't decided whether this is a first spring male Baltimore Oriole or a dark plumaged female variant. Note the previously mentioned food item in its beak:
    BALTIMORE ORIOLE 4 by k.nanney, on Flickr

    What a surprise! One of the orioles, that was pretty badly backlit when the image was taken, turned out to be a Baltimore X Bullock's Oriole hybrid upon post processing. The first one of these I have seen or photographed:
    HYBRID ORIOLE 1 by k.nanney, on Flickr

    HYBRID ORIOLE 2 by k.nanney, on Flickr

    Thanks, more spring migration images are coming soon......
    Last edited by Y Cymry; 05-25-2017 at 10:05 PM.
    Ken
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nanney/

    ...and they will see teal, blue-winged, green-winged, shelldrakes, whistlers, black ducks, ospreys, and many other wild and noble sights before night, such as they who sit in parlors never dream of. H. D. Thoreau - A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

  2. #2

    Default Re: A Gallery of Oriole Images - Hagerman NWR May 14

    And a bonus female Orchard Oriole I couldn't fit on the original post:
    ORCHARD ORIOLE 7 by k.nanney, on Flickr
    Ken
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nanney/

    ...and they will see teal, blue-winged, green-winged, shelldrakes, whistlers, black ducks, ospreys, and many other wild and noble sights before night, such as they who sit in parlors never dream of. H. D. Thoreau - A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

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